Grace Kelly is the epitome of elegance as she stuns in ageless throwback pictures

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Grace Kelly looked regal as both serving Princess of Monaco and legendary Hollywood star

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Grace Kelly dazzled in a series of snaps of Princess of Monaco from her heyday.

The Hollywood actress starred in hit films in the 1950’s, one of the most notable including How To Catch A Thief.

In 1956, Grace married Rainier III, Prince of Monaco, who she went on to have three children with.

On the big screen, the actress starred opposite some of Hollywood’s leading men, including Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby and Clark Gable.

Princess Grace was known for her blonde, perfectly coiffed tresses and her large, doe-eyed look on-screen.

After she married, Grace chose to put her acting aspirations to the side so she could perform her duties as a princess as well as pursue philanthropic work.

How To Catch a Thief is on today at 3.10pm on BBC Two.

See Grace Kelly’s Granddaughter Charlotte Reveal Her Acting Skills

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Watch : Prince Harry & Meghan’s FIRST Public Appearance With Royal Family

Charlotte Casiraghi is following in the musical footsteps of her family.

On July 14, the daughter of Princess Caroline of Hanover and granddaughter of actress-turned-royal Princess Grace Kelly stepped into the acting scene by starring as the leading lady in Sébastien Tellier’s music video for “Mademoiselle.”

The song, which served as a tribute to Coco Chanel, was inspired by the French luxury fashion house’s Fall/Winter pre-season collection. In the video, Charlotte shows off her dance moves, rides a flying shark and pets a giant white dog.

Due to her role as brand ambassador for Chanel, Charlotte, who is 11th in line to the throne of Monaco, has been able to tap into her other talents, including hosting podcasts and showing off her musical skills. Last May, Charlotte was tapped to sing at Chanel’s outdoor garden concert alongside Vanessa Paradis and Sébastien.

And being musically inclined runs in Charlotte’s family. In 1956, Princess Grace starred in the musical comedy High Society, in which she performed a duet with Bing Crosby called “True Love.” The track was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song.

Grace Kelly’s sacrifices on road to royalty: Why star had to give up Hollywood career

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While her marriage to the Prince of Monaco in 1956 shocked many, what could be even more surprising is the customs she had to adhere to before the wedding bells started ringing. The story of the world famous icon is being revisited in a documentary featuring her friends and family on Channel 4 .

Carol Kirkwood broke down in tears on BBC amid split from husband

Kelly married the prince in 1956, catapulting her celebrity status to royalty, but it did not come without a cost for the Hollywood starlet.

The literal cost for Kelly was widely reported at $2million (£1.67million) paid as a dowry to marry the prince.

Although Kelly’s family was reasonably wealthy, her father John Kelly took great offence to the request of a dowry, but she was eventually able to persuade him.

Alongside this, The Chicago Tribune reported she also had to submit a fertility test, allegedly to ensure that Kelly could provide an heir for the throne as one of her royal duties.

Lastly, Kelly famously had to give up her acting career in order to take on full-time wifely, and, eventually, mothering, duties.

READ MORE: Eva Longoria, 47, flashes major side-boob in stunning white swimsuit on Marbella holiday

Grace Kelly’s glamorous granddaughter Camille Gottlieb celebrates her 24th birthday

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Grace Kelly’s granddaughter Camille Gottlieb celebrated her 24th birthday with a pink cowboy themed party.

The royal, whose mother Princess Stephanie of Monaco is the younger sister of reigning Prince Albert, shared snaps of her fun-filled bash on Instagram yesterday.

The photos show the stylisth 20-something posing with a large pink and white floral display, and pouting for the camera in a cowboy hat.

Yehaw! Camille Gottlieb celebrated her 24th birthday with a pink cowboy themed party and shared the fun-filled photos on Instagram. Pictured, Camille (left) poses with a friend

Blooming lovely! Camille, whose mother Princess Stephanie of Monaco is the younger sister of Prince Albert, was given a spectacular display of pink and white roses for the occasion

Camille is the daughter of Stephanie and former palace security guard Jean Raymond Gottlieb, who is understood to have been head of the princess’s security detail when they started a relationship. Pictured, the couple in 1997

Another snap shows the birthday girl being given a kiss on the cheek by dashing fashion designer Andrea Del Monaco.

Camille is the daughter of Stephanie and former palace security guard Jean Raymond Gottlieb, who is understood to have been head of the princess’s security detail when they started a relationship.

Although Camille shares Gottlieb’s surname, his name is not on her birth certificate and Stephanie has never publicly confirmed that he is Camille’s father.

However Camille herself has identified Gottlieb, a former Paris gendarme, as her father in a gushing birthday post shared on Instagram in 2017.

A kiss for the birthday girl! Another snap shows the birthday girl being given a kiss on the cheek by dashing fashion designer Andrea Del Monaco

Pucker up! Camille shared another playful snap with a friend to mark her birthday last week

Fit for a princess! The royal was treated to an extraordinary birthday cake topped with fresh flowers, fruit and macarons. Camille often shares snaps of her glamorous life on Instagram

As Stephanie and Gottlieb never married, Camille is not in the line of succession to the Monegasque throne, unlike Stephanie’s two elder children, Louis, 29, and Pauline, 28, whom she shares with her first husband, bodyguard Daniel Ducruet.

When Camille was three years old, Stephanie began a relationship with married elephant trainer Franco Knie and moved, along with her three children, into Knie’s circus caravan.

However the relationship came to an end the following year and Stephanie returned with her children to Monaco.

Family ties: Prince Albert spoke about how he called on his sisters Stephanie (right) and Caroline (left) for support during his wife’s extended absence. Pictured, during Monaco Day celebrations in 2021

Night out: On Monday Camille joined her uncle Prince Albert and his wife Charlene at the Red Cross Gala in Monte Carlo. The birthday girl looked elegant in a black and gold dress and carried a chic black clutch bag

In 2003 Stephanie married Portuguese acrobat Adans Lopez Peres, who had been a member of Knie’s circus, but the marriage ended in 2004.

The princess recently stepped up to take a more active role in the lives of Prince Albert’s children while their mother Princess Charlene was in South Africa, then in Switzerland receiving in-patient treatment.

Prince Albert spoke about how he called on his sisters Stephanie and Caroline for support during his wife’s extended absence.

On Monday Camille joined her uncle Prince Albert and his wife Charlene at the Red Cross Gala in Monte Carlo.

The birthday girl looked elegant in a black and gold dress and carried a chic black clutch bag.

High Noon at 70: When Time is of the Essence

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Simple. Powerful. Unforgettable. High Noon.

For any film purporting to have dramatic heft, time is typically of the essence. The protagonist and their friends must accomplish such and such task before such and such time otherwise doom and gloom. It’s a narrative device as old as time itself, and, when utilized with deft, rarely fails. For some movies, the concept of time carries a greater meaning. Tenet, from Christopher Nolan, is all about time ticking away, both forwards and backwards. In other examples, the temporal anchoring bleeds into the fabric of virtually everything that makes up the story. Fred Zinneman’s High Noon, which turns 70, is one such case. Time, clocks, and period setting inform the viewer about everything there is to know.

Succinctly, the plot follows a harrowing hour and change for retiree Marshall Will Kane (Gary Cooper). Newly wed to pacifist Quaker Amy Fowler (Grace Kelly), he is just about to leave Hadleyville for his honeymoon when word travels that former foe Frank Miller (Ian MacDonald) is on the noon train. Frank was sent to hang by Kane but the former has since been pardoned. No need to put two and two together to understand that the villain and his boys are gathering at Hadleyville for revenge. It’s almost 11 am, meaning Kane has precious little time to deputize marshalls and protect the town. That task proves far more challenging than he could have ever predicted.

Why is this happening NOW?!?

Time-sensitive element #1.

Of all the gosh darned days when the dastardly Frank Miller chooses to arrive back in town and cause havoc with his gang (among them a young Lee Van Cleef), it had to be Will Kane’s wedding day. Compounding the issue is that on this beautiful day of nuptials Kane is hanging up badge for good. His law enforcement days are behind him and he has found himself a lovely wife (it’s Grace Kelly, so she’s heavenly in her loveliness).

Image: Paramount

He is looking a little worse for wear. A lot of that has to do with the fact that Gary Cooper plays the part. He was only 51 years old at the time, which in of itself is nothing notable. But health consciousness was not the same back then, so 51 meant something. He’s also mostly likely been shot at a few times, and that kind of stress is an efficient aging factor. Be that as it may, the point is that Kane looks as though he has merited a relaxing new chapter in his life. The time has come to leave the badge behind.

One more element is added to make the timing of the antagonist’s return even more distressing. The new Marshall of Hadleyville arrives tomorrow. Not today, but tomorrow. Kane knows that if he and Amy leave, Frank Miller will eventually track them down, but not before turning the town upside down.

Just when he wants to get out, they suck him back in.

How Much Time Do I Have?

Time-sensitive elements #2.

As the film starts, it’s right around quarter to eleven in the morning. The wedding ring has barely graced Amy’s finger when the news comes (during the celebration no less) that Frank Miller is going to be in town. He’s on the train scheduled to arrive at noon. These days the town is a bit light on policemen, except for Harvey Pell (Lloyd Bridges).

However, there’s one lingering issue. Harvey’s ambition was to become the next Town Marshall. For undisclosed reasons, he will not be. Worse, he suspects that the powers that be were discouraged to nominate him at least in part due to Kane’s council. Whether entirely accurate or not, the fact that the hero does not outright deny the accusation says something. Frustrated and afflicted by an unspoken inferiority complex, Pell storms off.

Given how things stand, Kane does not have much time to collect a posse of his own. He doesn’t help himself either by riding off temporarily with Amy before his conscious begs him to return. Precious minutes have already elapsed.

How Quickly Things Crumble

Time-sensitive element #3

Kane’s meandering visits around town for assistance do not bear fruit. Much to his dismay, virtually no one is willing to lend a hand, possibly their lives, for the cause. The Ramirez Saloon sounds like a decent place to find some hopeful gunslingers. Whether they’d be in a state or not is another matter altogether. As the barman boasts, plenty of folk in the room was tossed in the slammer by Kane. They sure ain’t gonna help him out now! Pell is present, getting as drunk as a skunk. As for the rest, there are no takers. The cause isn’t worth the risk.

Image: Paramount

No better luck at Church. Kane’s interruption of service is made even more embarrassing by the fact that because Amy is a Quaker, they forsook church as the location for their ceremony. The protagonist wouldn’t receive the warmest of welcomes at church on a good day. But desperate times call for desperate measures. The worshippers erupt in a debate.

How can they let the town go to heck at the hands of Frank Miller’s gang?!?

They aren’t paid to perform Marshall duty!

This isn’t their problem. The politicians are paid to make sure that towns have the required tools to protect themselves. Let them sort this out!

If they don’t do anything, northern folk won’t give Hadleyville the time of day. It’ll be just another wide-open town.

Finally, the mayor chimes in, arguing, politely, that the least worrisome scenario would be if Kane wasn’t present when Miller and company arrive. It’s him they’re after. Despondent, the Marshall leaves.

Even his former boss (Lon Chaney Jr.) refuses to join. He’s too old and his hands aren’t nearly what they used to be.

As the clock keeps ticking, all the old wounds, frustrations, and rivalries explode. Even the hero’s former flame Helen Ramirez (of the saloon fame, played by Katy Jurado) is dragged into it since she is currently Pell’s belle. As a proud Mexican-American, she would stay and fight alongside her man, only Kane isn’t her man anymore and Pell won’t fight.

Director Fred Zinneman intelligently exposes the delicacy of the town’s social fabric. What started as a glorious, memorable day filled with love and laughter is torn apart quite literally in less than an hour. The saloon patrons are conflicted, the churchgoers are conflicted, the Marshall’s wife is conflicted, his deputy is conflicted, and his former girlfriend is conflicted. And things were going so swimmingly.

Everything was fine barely an hour ago!

Keeping it Real…in Real Time

Time-sensitive element #4

Another detail makes up the greatness of High Noon. Something unsuspecting viewers may not notice at first. Not that the film doesn’t play well if they don’t, but it adds an extra special quality to the film.

Zinneman and editors Elmo Williams and Harry W. Gerstad pace the story so that it plays out in real-time. It runs 85 minutes, in other words, 1 hour and 25 minutes. The villains reconvene at the train station and head to town for the climactic gunfight with about 10 minutes left. When Kane is informed that Frank Miller is heading, he glances up at the clock and sees that it’s 10:40. It isn’t perfect real-time, but close enough to heighten the tension.

Image: Paramount

Considering all the drama explained above in the previous sections, the framing device works wonders. Images of clocks abound. Whether intentional or not, Zinneman even has the camera capture a watch repair shop sign in the background at one point. Characters look up to take note of how much time is left until high noon.. None more so than Kane himself, who eventually realizes that he will most likely have to face off the villains by himself. There simply isn’t enough time.

Stand the Test of Time

This article could go on and on about the crucial role time plays in High Noon. It’s in the title, after all. The lackies who await Frank keep asking the station manager if the train is still expected for noon. The story of revenge and potential violence takes place on a Sunday, a church day. Despite there being plenty of drunkards at the saloon, it’s still only the morning. A reference to “northern folk” alludes to the north-south divide that still defines the United States. In the Marshall’s office, there is a small news poster with the title President Declares War in reference to the Civil War (the story is set in 1870).

While it is simple to argue that the notion of time is important to any movie, Zinneman explores it in creative ways with High Noon. It adds depth, and emotional layers to the story, informs its thematic resonance, and serves as a ticking clock device for tension.

For newcomers, it’s well worth their time.

-Edgar Chaput

What You Don’t Know About Monaco’s Charlotte Casiraghi

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Having Princess Caroline for a mother and Princess Grace (aka Grace Kelly) for a grandmother, Charlotte Casiraghi grew up surrounded by female role models — strong and successful women who, despite the times, pursued interests and careers that were uncommon for women. Born to a model and competitive swimmer mother who became the first women’s athletics director at the University of Pennsylvania (per The New York Times), Grace Kelly was known as one of Hollywood’s highest-paid actresses in the 1950s (via Vanity Fair). And, at only 25 years old, Caroline had to take on many of her mother’s leadership roles after Grace’s tragic death in 1982 (per Hello Monaco).

Born on August 3, 1986, to Caroline and Stefano Casiraghi, Charlotte was named after her paternal great-grandmother, Princess Charlotte, Duchess of Valentinois, whom Caroline described to Madame Figaro in 2020 as “a very free woman and an original” (via Tatler).

According to Vanity Fair, Charlotte’s mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother were far from the only independent women of the bunch. There was also Princess Alice, wife of Prince Albert I, known for bringing style and culture to Monaco. And, in the present day, there’s Pauline Ducruet, Charlotte’s cousin who launched a gender-neutral clothing brand. Charlotte described the women in her family to Harper’s Bazaar as “extremely daring women who did not pursue the life that was expected from them.”